Psychotherapy Research

Brief self-affirmation intervention for adults with psoriasis for reducing anxiety and depression and boosting well-being: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial

Background
There are relatively few studies to address mental health implications of self-affirming, especially across groups experiencing a chronic health condition. In this study, short- and longer-term effects of a brief self-affirmation intervention framed in terms of implementation intentions (if-then plans with self-affirming cognitions; S-AII) were evaluated against an active control group (non-affirming implementation intentions; N-AII), matched to the target condition, and mere goal intention condition (a non-active control) in adults with psoriasis. The three pre-registered primary outcomes captured depression, anxiety, and well-being.

Methods
Adults with psoriasis (N = 175; Mage = 36.53, s.d. = 11.52) were randomized into S-AII, N-AII, or control. Participants’ mental health outcomes were assessed prior to randomization (at baseline), at week 2 (post-intervention), and at a 1-month follow-up.

Results
Linear mixed models were used and results were reported on the intention-to-treat principle. Analyses revealed that S-AII exerted significantly more improvement in the course of well-being (ds > 0.25), depressive symptoms (ds > −0.40), and anxiety (ds > −0.45) than the N-AII and control group at 2-week post-intervention. Though the differences between groups faded at 1-month follow-up, the within-group changes over time for S-AII in all mental health outcomes remained significant.

Conclusions
Brief and low-intensity S-AII intervention exerted in the short-term a considerable impact on mental health outcomes. The S-AII shows promising results as a relevant public mental health strategy for enhancing well-being and reducing psychological distress. Future studies could consider whether these effects can be further enhanced with booster interventions.

Online group music therapy: proactive management of undergraduate students’ stress and anxiety

Click here for the article published by Frontiers in Psychiatry. In alignment with the World Health Organization’s (WHO) goal to provide comprehensive and integrated mental health services in community-based settings, this randomized control trial explored the efficacy of online group music therapy as a proactive intervention for reducing stress and anxiety in university students who …

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Multiple psychotherapeutic approaches and perspectives on eco-anxiety

In highly diverse psychotherapy practices, psychotherapists with their individual schemas and personalities treat patients who are just as individual, each with his/her own partially dysfunctional schema, personality, worldview, and life situation. Intuition gained through experience is often applied, and a wide range of perspectives, techniques, and treatment options appropriate to the specific situation and psychotherapist-patient relationship are required for successful treatment of eco-anxiety manifestations. Several examples will be used to present the approaches of different psychotherapeutic approaches to eco-anxiety such as analytical psychology, logotherapy and existential analysis, psychodrama, and Morita-therapy. The treatment-possibilities-expanding psychotherapy science is presented, which helps psychotherapists to look beyond their original learned approach and learn about new perspectives and treatment methods in a methodologically sound way, which they already do intuitively.

Negative feelings toward borderline patients: Are layperson emotional reactions disorder-specific?

Click here for the article published by Psychoanalytic Psychology (APA) anxiety. Psychoanalytic Psychology, Vol 40(2), Apr 2023, 115-120; doi:10.1037/pap0000421 Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are typically confronted with others having negative emotional reactions toward them. This is especially the case with therapeutic laypersons in the health care system as well as in their social …

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Radical healing in psychotherapy: Addressing the wounds of racism-related stress and trauma.

Click here for the article published by Psychotherapy (APA journal). Psychotherapy, Vol 60(1), Mar 2023, 39-50; doi:10.1037/pst0000435 There is a large body of research on the importance of addressing culture in psychotherapy. However, less is known about providing critically conscious and racially affirmative therapy for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) clients in the …

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Defining and assessing adverse events and harmful effects in psychotherapy study protocols: A systematic review.

Click here for the article published by Psychotherapy (APA journal). Psychotherapy, Vol 60(1), Mar 2023, 130-148; doi:10.1037/pst0000359 The assessment of safety data has become a standard across many clinical interventions. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the extent to which harm is addressed within psychotherapy study protocols. The review includes study protocols …

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